REVIEWS

WOMAN WRITERS MAGAZINE says:
Great fun.... Maclean has done a wonderful job of capturing Alcott's voice and style.... I suspect the real Alcott would have liked it and wished she had written it herself.

Alison Lurie writes in THE NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS:
"A historically accurate and entrtaining mystery series."




"It was perhaps inevitable that Louisa May Alcott, the pseudonymous author of so many blood-and-thunder tales, would herself take up sleuthing. This tale of dark secrets, mysterious men, and heiresses in distress will please any reader who has longed to pursue Jo March's 'sensation stories,' those lucrative tales that allowed Beth to go to the seashore, but of which the good Professor Bhaer so stoutly disapproved. As Jo herself might say, a thumping good read." ---


"I suppose it is some strange new custom," complained Miss Alfreda Thorney. "Inviting guests and then not being there to greet them. I never."
Miss Thorney was the personage we referred to in private as the Medusa, for the thick, curling salt-and-pepper hair that snaked around her forehead and cheeks in a style of hairdressing that had been popular some thirty years before; and because her glance could turn men to stone. Or so I had imagined as a little girl, when the mere sight of her would compel me to run aay in terror. Unfortunately, as an adult, I found her only slightly less terrifying. There were, after all, those rumors of her instability, of a two-year period when she had been locked into a room with only the family doctor for a visitor.
"Mrs. Wortham is only back from a long voyabe," I protested gently, braving the Medusa's stern glance. "I am confident some pressing matter arose at the last minute, and that she will be home soon."

Gentle reader, if only I had been correct in that assessment!

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SELECTED REVIEWS

Great fun.... Maclean has done a wonderful job of capturing Alcott's voice and style.... I suspect the real Alcott would have liked it and wished she had written it herself.
"A historically accurate and entertaining mystery series."
"It was perhaps inevitable that Louisa May Alcott, the pseudonymous author of so many blood-and-thunder tales, would, herself, take up sleuthing. This tale of dark secrets, mysterious men, and heiresses in distress will please any reader who has longed to pursue Jo March's 'sensation stories,' those lucrative tales that allowed Beth to go to the seashore, but of which the good Professor Bhaer so stoutly disapproved. As Jo herself might say, a thumping good read."